The Body Makeover Part Two

Standard

The initial assessment: ugh!

To prep for my first real workout in 7 years, I ate a healthy lunch of movie theater popcorn and Coke. That’s right- I was a full ten minutes late because I went to a movie with friends before.

She forgave me for that and we immediately began the dreaded weighing and measuring. While I am not confidant enough to post that number online for all to see, I will tell you that my reaction to hearing my BMI was 27. Overweight starts at 25…I wanted to cry and immediately regretted stuffing my face with salt and sugar less than an hour beforehand.

Then began the real work: performing a variety of tests to see exactly what I was capable of doing.

- Balancing in both feet on a bosu ball and doing squats and then bicep curls and rows with free weights. I barely completed these as I was so concerned about my ankle. I kept stepping off because I was scared. I flat out refused to lift a free weight heavier than 3 pounds because I was scared of hurting my wrists.

-Lunges every way they can possibly be done, as fast as I can. I had a hard time balancing because of my left ankle. Legitimate hard time here, not a refusal to try because of fear.

-Catching, bouncing, and throwing a weighted medicine ball. LOL. That is all that can be said except for maybe an apology to the guy I almost hit. Note that this was a 5 lb medicine ball.

-How many sit-ups I ca do in a minute/how many push-ups can I do in a minute. I did a respectable 30 sit-ups. Proud of that stat. But y’all. I did a half ass ONE girl push-up and then used the rest of the minute to bitch about how I hate push-ups.

You get the drift.

When we finished, she made a couple of recommendations.

First, she recommended I try spinning classes as it wouldn’t stress my ankle or my wrists and if I got tired, I could just sit down.

Second, she recommended I try to do at least 15 minutes 3 times a week on the elliptical as it would take my ankle through all of the proper ranges of motion while offering support.

Third, she recommended the aquatics classes.

Then she brought over the calendar for spin and aquatics and made me commit to which classes I was going to show up for. I picked a couple and she mentioned that she could log in and see if I actually showed up. Accountability is a big motivator for me! She also said that it was ok if I didn’t finish the whole class; just to try and do what I felt I could do. Looking back, giving me this out really made me attempt a lot more than I thought I would.

And finally, she looked at me and said ‘I know you’re scared to get hurt and I know you’re very protective of your body BUT remember back to when you worked out before and know that there’s a big difference between something feeling hard and something feeling painful. I will never ask you to do anything painful but if something’s hard, I only ask that you give it a fair try.’

She was 200% correct. There’s a huge difference between hard and painful, and I had forgotten that.

Coming up next: the actual work begins, and relearning to love what’s hard

12 responses »

  1. This is Inspiring! I am STILL waiting for some meds to kick in (After 2years) and I can not WAIT until the point that I am able to go and work out. And you are so right – There is a complete difference between RA pain and a workout being hard – It’s easy to forget that sometimes! I am loving your blog, FYI – I hope mine becomes as good as this!

  2. I LOVE your blog! I get so excited when you post because I can always relate somehow and I know I will feel more positive and motivated afterward. Thank you for being so honest!

  3. Boy, your Trainer is so much better than most of the people who have set me up with workouts. Congrats on sticking with it. I was diagnosed at 27 and always felt that it is important to support the joints with strong muscles. Through the years I think it has really helped.

  4. GOOD FOR YOU!!! This is so inspiring. I started swimming again after a long hiatus and immediately thought, “Now why did I stop doing this again?” There were complicated immune system reasons, but those are resolved and by God, I’m back!

  5. Inspiring is the best descriptive. I am so interested in hearing these stories. I applaud you for taking the initiative and setting the goals. I was involved in competitive sports and very much involved in fitness classes and weights. Since my diagnosis – nothing. I am in the worst shape of my life – so this is such an inspiration. Thank you for sharing.

  6. I know you’re scared to get hurt and I know you’re very protective of your body BUT remember back to when you worked out before and know that there’s a big difference between something feeling hard and something feeling painful. I will never ask you to do anything painful but if something’s hard, I only ask that you give it a fair try.’

    This is amazeballz. I will try to live by this in my physical activity. Yay you for embarking on this journey!

  7. I love spinning and hasn’t really hurt with my RA. I just make sure I have a light grip on the handbars (or no grip just flat hands). Best thing is you put the resistance on for how you feel that day. Have fun and I hope you like it.

  8. I have found that every time I do PT for one part of my body or the other, how much better I feel; physically and mentally. Then, I stop the exercise and I am back to my painful self again. You inspire me and I appreciate your sharing your RA journey with us. I was not in great shape when I was diagnosed, but I was a mover and a shaker. If you were ever in Harris Teeter and a woman came flying by you with her cart on race wheels, well, that would have been me! I rarely go in HT now. I walked all over Charleston, went to college football games (I actually walked up all those hills in Chapel Hill to get to the stadium) – no problem. Not any more. You keep sharing your story with us, keep inspiring us…maybe I will get the nerve to get back in the gym and start off with the bike and see what that leads to….maybe a football game this fall…baby steps.

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